19 10 / 2014

captain-foulenough:

cthulhu-with-a-fez:

inspector-snuggles:

mcdownies:

the-bite-of-frost:

swingsetindecember:

that guy’s phone in the first panel became more high tech in tony stark’s presence

I am laughing so fucking hard

oh my god how did I miss that

omfg

tony stark literally upgraded a flip phone to a smartphone by being within three feet of it

People pass their old technology close to him for his blessing and lo! It is upgraded. The miracle of the flip into the smart shall be told unto the ages. 

(Source: fuckyeahgarybarlow, via rabbitswillruletheworld)

19 10 / 2014

vivacosima:

cat: places paw tentatively on boob
me: please–
cat: presses paw down on boob
me: don’t–
cat: slowly, agonizingly walks across boobs

(Source: majesdanes, via cherry-sailor)

19 10 / 2014

just-for-grins:

Instant Karma Gifs

(via senashenta)

19 10 / 2014

onlylolgifs:

baby arctic fox tries to eat a man alive

(via rabbitswillruletheworld)

19 10 / 2014

19 10 / 2014

  • 1: [gently touches the sleeping cat]
  • 2: [makes a tiny cat noise]
  • 1: ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh nooooooooooooooooooooooooo ohh noo ohhhhh nooooooo oh no oh nooooo oh my god oh noooo

19 10 / 2014

cecilyjeanne:

stunningpicture:

Moving out of the apartment

This is, without a doubt, the saddest photo I have ever seen in my ENTIRE LIFE.

cecilyjeanne:

stunningpicture:

Moving out of the apartment

This is, without a doubt, the saddest photo I have ever seen in my ENTIRE LIFE.

(via cherry-sailor)

19 10 / 2014

punlich:

kiloueka:

punlich:

kiloueka:

is it your own skin though? As in you grew it, on your own body, from birth?

This skin was grown yes. On a human body. That is mine. I’m not a robot

Ok ok I’ll believe you… If you first tell me what this says:

image

I don’t need to prove myself to you how dare you, I love breathing oxygen

(via happymeday)

19 10 / 2014

theodorepython:

maxistentialist:

Tweenbots by Kacie Kinzer:

Given their extreme vulnerability, the vastness of city space, the dangers posed by traffic, suspicion of terrorism, and the possibility that no one would be interested in helping a lost little robot, I initially conceived the Tweenbots as disposable creatures which were more likely to struggle and die in the city than to reach their destination. Because I built them with minimal technology, I had no way of tracking the Tweenbot’s progress, and so I set out on the first test with a video camera hidden in my purse. I placed the Tweenbot down on the sidewalk, and walked far enough away that I would not be observed as the Tweenbot––a smiling 10-inch tall cardboard missionary––bumped along towards his inevitable fate.
The results were unexpected. Over the course of the following months, throughout numerous missions, the Tweenbots were successful in rolling from their start point to their far-away destination assisted only by strangers. Every time the robot got caught under a park bench, ground futilely against a curb, or became trapped in a pothole, some passerby would always rescue it and send it toward its goal. Never once was a Tweenbot lost or damaged. Often, people would ignore the instructions to aim the Tweenbot in the “right” direction, if that direction meant sending the robot into a perilous situation. One man turned the robot back in the direction from which it had just come, saying out loud to the Tweenbot, “You can’t go that way, it’s toward the road.”
The Tweenbot’s unexpected presence in the city created an unfolding narrative that spoke not simply to the vastness of city space and to the journey of a human-assisted robot, but also to the power of a simple technological object to create a complex network powered by human intelligence and asynchronous interactions. But of more interest to me, was the fact that this ad-hoc crowdsourcing was driven primarily by human empathy for an anthropomorphized object. The journey the Tweenbots take each time they are released in the city becomes a story of people’s willingness to engage with a creature that mirrors human characteristics of vulnerability, of being lost, and of having intention without the means of achieving its goal alone. As each encounter with a helpful pedestrian takes the robot one step closer to attaining it’s destination, the significance of our random discoveries and individual actions accumulates into a story about a vast space made small by an even smaller robot.


Man this is still one of my favorite little social projects/experiments.

theodorepython:

maxistentialist:

Tweenbots by Kacie Kinzer:

Given their extreme vulnerability, the vastness of city space, the dangers posed by traffic, suspicion of terrorism, and the possibility that no one would be interested in helping a lost little robot, I initially conceived the Tweenbots as disposable creatures which were more likely to struggle and die in the city than to reach their destination. Because I built them with minimal technology, I had no way of tracking the Tweenbot’s progress, and so I set out on the first test with a video camera hidden in my purse. I placed the Tweenbot down on the sidewalk, and walked far enough away that I would not be observed as the Tweenbot––a smiling 10-inch tall cardboard missionary––bumped along towards his inevitable fate.

The results were unexpected. Over the course of the following months, throughout numerous missions, the Tweenbots were successful in rolling from their start point to their far-away destination assisted only by strangers. Every time the robot got caught under a park bench, ground futilely against a curb, or became trapped in a pothole, some passerby would always rescue it and send it toward its goal. Never once was a Tweenbot lost or damaged. Often, people would ignore the instructions to aim the Tweenbot in the “right” direction, if that direction meant sending the robot into a perilous situation. One man turned the robot back in the direction from which it had just come, saying out loud to the Tweenbot, “You can’t go that way, it’s toward the road.”

The Tweenbot’s unexpected presence in the city created an unfolding narrative that spoke not simply to the vastness of city space and to the journey of a human-assisted robot, but also to the power of a simple technological object to create a complex network powered by human intelligence and asynchronous interactions. But of more interest to me, was the fact that this ad-hoc crowdsourcing was driven primarily by human empathy for an anthropomorphized object. The journey the Tweenbots take each time they are released in the city becomes a story of people’s willingness to engage with a creature that mirrors human characteristics of vulnerability, of being lost, and of having intention without the means of achieving its goal alone. As each encounter with a helpful pedestrian takes the robot one step closer to attaining it’s destination, the significance of our random discoveries and individual actions accumulates into a story about a vast space made small by an even smaller robot.

Man this is still one of my favorite little social projects/experiments.

(via rabbitswillruletheworld)

19 10 / 2014

autieblesam:

ghost-of-bambi:

luckyladybutterfly:

velvetonions:

there needs to be a cooking show in which tv chefs go into student flats or houses and have to cook a full 3 course meal only using ingredients and equipment they can find in the kitchen

#HOW AM I SUPPOSED TO COOK ANYTHING WITH DORITOS AND INSTANT NOODLES#THEY DON’T EVEN HAVE A SAUCEPAN.

They do have a saucepan, but someone’s eating cereal out of it.

"Pasta. Why is there so much pasta? Who would ever eat that much pasta?"

(Source: queerodactyl, via cherry-sailor)

19 10 / 2014

mewitti:

I held a sphynx cat once. It felt like a warm, squirmy peach.

mewitti:

I held a sphynx cat once. It felt like a warm, squirmy peach.

(via cherry-sailor)

19 10 / 2014

conceptartthings:

Concept Art for The Lion King (1994) requested by yourg-ay

(via life-in-animation)

19 10 / 2014

graphrofberk:

-I’m excited. I love setting up stands and putting up banners and getting everyone fired up to watch boats sail sloooooowly across the harbor.

(via jettara)

19 10 / 2014

officialcrow:

this the realest post on this whole shit

officialcrow:

this the realest post on this whole shit

(Source: thumbleesin, via cherry-sailor)

19 10 / 2014

unamusedsloth:

"We should eat whatever those things are." [via]

unamusedsloth:

"We should eat whatever those things are." [via]

(via happymeday)